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Tatting Tips: when you run out of thread

      If you run out of threaddouble knot where you stop, cut thread about 4” from work, hide thread ends in work, and snip off excess. 

Then simply rethread needle as before. Attach thread were you left off, by inserting needle where you wish to start, bring it up, and make a simple knot at the base of the work, leaving roughly 12” of free thread between the flush knot and the thread on the needle. Then place your needle against your previous work and begin to tat. 

All text copyright © of Katy King

Tatting Tips: knot

A basic knot should be placed at the end of each chain (Ch. and ring (R.) as it is completed, to secure it and maintain proper shape. At the completion of a project (or if you run out of thread), double knot where you stop, cut thread about 4” from work, hide thread ends in work, and snip off excess. 

All text copyright © of Katy King

Tatting Tips: close (cl.)

This refers to the forming of a ring (R.). Closing (cl.) is the removal of a ring’s stitches from the needle and the passing of the needle through the loop at the end of the thread’s tail. Tension is then put on the thread until the ring takes its proper shape. 

All text copyright © of Katy King 

Tatting Tips: reverse work (Rw.)

 It is helpful to remember that when starting a ring (R.), in most cases, it should point towards the left (think of a wedding “ring” on the “left” hand). When starting a chain (Ch.), it should point towards the right

If directions state Not to Reveres Work (NRw.), or does not designate either Rw. or NRw., after a ring or chain, then do not reverse work.  Reversing work determines the way your tatting will lay, and the direction in which the work will go, so refer back to the project photo often, as a guide; especially on vintage patterns, as they may not always indicate this step in their directions. 
     
All text copyright © of Katy King

Tatting Tips: picot(p) and double stitch(ds)

Picot, the space that is left between double stitches, to form a loop. It is helpful to remember that a ds. (double stitch) is always counted as a stitch, even when it appears to be part of a picot.

                                                      All text copyright © of Katy King